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Article by  Amanda Jasi AS it has for many aspects of society, the Covid-19 pandemic has served a blow to the education system. Universities have been forced to change how they operate to enable students to continue learning in the face of imposed restrictions and safety measures. How have teaching methods changed? And how well have they been received? To get a better understanding of this, in early 2021, The Chemical...
By  Maurice J. Elias , Edutopia   High school students spend a lot of time thinking about who they are and who they will be in the world. They think about their upcoming decisions about college and careers. All this naturally pushes them toward a lot of concern with “I.” Educators need to help ensure that the “we” stay in the picture as well. And that’s why it’s necessary to encourage...
By  Sarah Gonser , Edutopia For many children, the past year brought disruption on a grand scale, with the pandemic affecting virtually every aspect of their daily lives. And while “caregivers can’t always alter children’s circumstances or shield them from discomfort, they can offer a more enduring gift: tools to manage adversity,” writes therapist and school counselor  Phyllis L. Fagell for ...
By  Jorge Valenzuela , Edutopia   Being empathic toward students directly correlates with our ability to share in their feelings and perspectives and understand their academic needs. Empathy maps can be a scaffold that individual teachers or grade-level teams use to begin empathizing with students while simultaneously increasing their knowledge of them—which is critical for raising equity in schools. The...
By  Michele Coulombe ,  Erin Zuccaro , Edutopia   Whether kindness is innate or not, being purposeful about teaching it definitely contributes to a positive classroom culture. When you focus on kindness, you send the message of its value in your classroom community. Modeling and encouraging kind behavior and reflecting on its presence in your classroom can create an environment of care. Prioritizing kindness helps...
By  Kathryn Fishman-Weaver ,  Stephanie Walter , Edutopia   The last year has been one of constant recalibration as many of us move from teaching in person to online to hybrid and back to in person. Reentry is on all of our minds, with many of us wondering how educators can support our students’ well-being. As administrators of a global school, we see how this essential challenge presents itself across...
By  Nora Fleming , Edutopia   In mid-February, three snowstorms knocked out the electricity for thousands of residents in Boyd County, Kentucky. As they waited for up to two weeks for the lights to come on, many residents were left snowbound in their homes in freezing temperatures. Two people died from hypothermia before power was restored. The outages added insult to injury for a rural community struggling to keep...
By  Elena Spathis ,  Edutopia Avoiding lectures in favor of games and lessons that emphasize culture can help remote students stay engaged. With students learning in hybrid and virtual formats, optimizing engagement and increasing motivation are more challenging than ever before. In any setting, involving students in their own learning is key; we cannot expect them to be enthusiastic or motivated if they are merely fed...
By  Maureen Picard Robins , Edutopia Digital conversations are a good way to connect with students learning at home—and they can serve as a useful artifact of learning. Engaging teenagers in classroom discussion has often confounded me through my many roles in education as teacher, staff developer, assistant principal, and now adjunct professor and student-teacher supervisor. It’s as if the conditions have...
By  Lori Desautels , Edutopia Whether students are in class or at home, these quick breaks can help them find calm and prime their brains for learning. The traumatic conditions of isolation, chronic unpredictability, and physical and emotional distance over the past year are affecting everyone, but children and adolescents are experiencing these effects as they are still developing. Toxic levels of stress can wear out...
COVID-19 has been with us for a year, and the negative consequences of disrupted learning are becoming clear especially for our youngest learners. Researchers who studied children in Alberta report that in grades 2 and 3, children  are six to eight months behind where they would usually be in reading . International researchers have  projected the possibility of serious long-term consequences  if learning losses are not...
We know COVID-19 and its associated changes to our work and learning habits caused a marked increase in the use of technology. More surprising, perhaps, is the impact these lockdowns have had on children’s and young people’s self-reported enjoyment of books and the overall positive impact this has made on reading rates. A  recent survey  from the UK, for example, showed children were spending 34.5% more time reading...